Friday, May 1, 2009

For May Day - That Opium Quote in Fuller Context

From the Introduction to Marx's A Contribution to the Critique of Hegel’s Philosophy of Right:

The foundation of irreligious criticism is: Man makes religion, religion does not make man. Religion is, indeed, the self-consciousness and self-esteem of man who has either not yet won through to himself, or has already lost himself again. But man is no abstract being squatting outside the world. Man is the world of man – state, society. This state and this society produce religion, which is an inverted consciousness of the world, because they are an inverted world. Religion is the general theory of this world, its encyclopaedic compendium, its logic in popular form, its spiritual point d’honneur, its enthusiasm, its moral sanction, its solemn complement, and its universal basis of consolation and justification. It is the fantastic realization of the human essence since the human essence has not acquired any true reality. The struggle against religion is, therefore, indirectly the struggle against that world whose spiritual aroma is religion.

Religious suffering is, at one and the same time, the expression of real suffering and a protest against real suffering. Religion is the sigh of the oppressed creature, the heart of a heartless world, and the soul of soulless conditions. It is the opium of the people.

The abolition of religion as the illusory happiness of the people is the demand for their real happiness. To call on them to give up their illusions about their condition is to call on them to give up a condition that requires illusions. The criticism of religion is, therefore, in embryo, the criticism of that vale of tears of which religion is the halo.

Criticism has plucked the imaginary flowers on the chain not in order that man shall continue to bear that chain without fantasy or consolation, but so that he shall throw off the chain and pluck the living flower. The criticism of religion disillusions man, so that he will think, act, and fashion his reality like a man who has discarded his illusions and regained his senses, so that he will move around himself as his own true Sun. Religion is only the illusory Sun which revolves around man as long as he does not revolve around himself.

It is, therefore, the task of history, once the other-world of truth has vanished, to establish the truth of this world. It is the immediate task of philosophy, which is in the service of history, to unmask self-estrangement in its unholy forms once the holy form of human self-estrangement has been unmasked. Thus, the criticism of Heaven turns into the criticism of Earth, the criticism of religion into the criticism of law, and the criticism of theology into the criticism of politics.
It's hardly necessary to grant every last claim made here to see that Marx was saying something more substantial than, and quite distinct from, the commonplace reduction to "Marx thought religion was nothing but a drug."

1 comment:

twoblueday said...

That is such a poorly-written screed that if I'd handed it in to my freshman English teacher as expository writing I'd have gotten an F. I'm not kidding. That woman was tyrannical when it came to writing. I think every "college track" student who took her class got a couple of Fs before discovering that grades would be based on performance and the devil take the hindmost.

Imagine a whole political philosophy was, allegedly, based on this sort of blathering. I say "allegedly" because, as far as I can tell, the governments espousing adherence to this crap were/are really just using it to justify oppressive dictatorships.