Monday, August 16, 2010

E =What Now?

It has been quite a while since I checked on Conservapedia, the preferred online reference for knuckle-draggers who can still thumb their way to a web site. I am here to report that at the possible peril of the methinks-the-site-doth-protest-too-much obsession with homosexuality, Conservapedia has recently taken to condemning modern physics:
It says: "The theory of relativity is a mathematical system that allows no exceptions. It is heavily promoted by liberals who like its encouragement of relativism and its tendency to mislead people in how they view the world."

In a footnote, this comment is followed up by: "Virtually no one who is taught and believes relativity continues to read the Bible, a book that outsells New York Times bestsellers by a hundred-fold."
The finer points of the theory of relativity elude me, but I feel confident in saying it doesn't depend on drawing more readers than the Bible, nor on drawing readers away from the Bible and toward New York Times bestsellers.

I don't mean to sell the knuckle-draggers short -- their attack on physics goes deeper than book sales:
The Conservapedia page then lists 30 counterexamples to general relativity, any of which, it claims, "shows that the theory is incorrect". Many of these are bizarre, such as "the action-at-a-distance by Jesus, described in John 4:46-54." Apparently, Jesus's ability to instantaneously heal a child from a distance – his healing powers travelled through space faster than the speed of light – was evidence enough to rule out Einstein's theory.
They have a point, don't they? A glance at Einstein's seminal 1905 paper that first derived a version of E=mc2 reveals no mention of Jesus's remote healing powers. In fact, there are no citations of the Bible at all.

It really does seem as though Einstein was trying to distract readers from the folklore of bronze-age primitives, and from the amazing sales figures of the Bible, in favor of whatever the hell he was saying with the math and reasoning.

2 comments:

Sheldon said...

"It says: "The theory of relativity is a mathematical system that allows no exceptions. It is heavily promoted by liberals who like its encouragement of relativism and its tendency to mislead people in how they view the world.""

Here is a very interesting point, contradiction, paradox or something.
According to Conservapedia, the theory of relativity allegedly allows no exceptiions. I interpret this sentence as meaning liberals allegedly like this theory of relativity because it lends some kind of support to "ethical relativism". According to the conservatives, this is the problem with "ethical relativism", that it is not absolute like God's law and morality. So how does the theory of relativity support the ethical relativism of liberals? Confused yet? I am.

Dale said...

Sheldon, I am beyond confused when it comes to this little bit of ax-grining from Conservapedia. I can only stand back, strap in, and feel the g-forces of it.